***WINNER OF THE 2024 TRILLIUM BOOK AWARD***


SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE 2023 LONGLIST


GLOBE AND MAIL'S BEST BOOKS OF 2023


APPLE BOOKS: BEST CANADIAN DEBUT of 2023


CBC'S BEST CANADIAN FICTION OF 2023


CBC'S WRITERS TO WATCH 2023


...


"ENTRANCING DEBUT NOVEL"

The Globe and Mail

"the clarion is impressive indeed"

Robert J. Wiersema, Toronto Star Review

"an extraordinary debut"

— Aaron Schneider, author of The Supply Chain

"beautiful and devastating"

— Sarah Marie, The Miramichi Reader

AVAILaBLE HERE

Canadian Booksellers: SHOP LOCAL 
U.S. Booksellers: Bookshop.org
Invisible Publishing 
IndigoAmazon

bio

Represented by Akin Akinwumi at Willenfield Literary Agency.

Born in Belgrade and brought to Toronto as an infant. Grew up in Scarborough and Pickering, attended the University of Toronto, graduated from Centennial College for journalism. After the first Star contest win, I received a free mentorship from the Humber School for Writers — I am grateful for that opportunity.

Also a freelance journalist — bylines include The Canadian Press, CBC, Toronto Star, Storeys.com,  and The Globe and Mail, among others.

Wandered in and out of various careers before starting fiction. Now living in Scarborough again.

X/IG: @dunicnina

"a novel of small, graceful moments of epiphany"


— TORONTO STAR REVIEW

short fiction:


Toronto Star Short Story Contest Winner:  Youth
Humber Literary Review Emerging Writers Contest 3rd Place:  Bodies.
Toronto Star Short Story Contest Winner:  Cardinal
The Journey Prize nomination:  The Apartment.

Longlisted in the CBC Short Story Prize (2023)
Longlisted in the CBC Short Story Prize (2022)
Longlisted in the CBC Short Story Prize (2020)
Longlisted in the CBC Short Story Prize (2019)
Longlisted in Room Magazine's 2023 Fiction Contest

TORONTO STAR

CONTEST JUDGES

"clean writing unfolds the perfectly paced narrative in a powerfully quiet way;
there's not a word out of place"

GRAIN MAGAZINE

FICTION EDITOR

"the images and prose are stunning”

THE TEMZ REVIEW

FOUNDER

"precisely the reason I loved the story, because it doesn't flinch"

MASIONNEUVE MAGAZINE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

"languorous and existential"

THE OPIATE MAGAZINE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

"simultaneously unique yet all too relatable ... timeless human feeling"

There was something pure about them, like elements. Life was long with so much sameness and repetition, life had a way of tempering you out, smoothing and polishing you down. Teenagers were pure like animals, elemental, hot and bright or dark and cold, sparking off each other, reactive and explosive. But sloppy and blind and foolish, with bravado so charming and pathetic; they were mere children who had grown too big, still smashing into things.

She remembered earlier years when she did not like teenagers, saw something cynical in that bravado. But her only child had died before birth and it had left her so fatally humbled and longing. She saw so much wounded innocence and longing in them. And pride and vanity and struggling to pull themselves out of the bewildering madness of youth — the struggle to become someone, even only just themselves.


excerpt from

youth

 


photos by DTD  ©  copyright nina dunic